ZUKUNFT DER BEHINDERUNG – abstracts 3/2019

ABSTRACTS
Meinrad Furrer
IMPERFECT THEOLOGY: STIMULUS FOR DISCUSSION ABOUT THE FUTURE OF DISABILITY
An evident trend toward (self-)optimization is emerging in our society, which threatens to become increasingly more narcissistic. Fates can be avoided when, for instance, the possibilities of pre-natal technology put the definition of a «worthwhile» life up for discussion. The author pleads from a theological point of view for a rethinking and willingness of all people to experience themselves as having needs in order to break down the «separation of people into the giver and recipients of help».
Keywords: (self-)optimization, culture of feasibility, meritocracy, Christianity, conception of humanity, Jesus, inclusion, creation
Page: 4

Bertolt Meyer in conversation with Georges T. Roos
FRANKENSTEIN 2050
Until now, humans have used technology to transform their environment. Increasingly, they are transforming themselves – through implanted technology. They are becoming cyborgs. For now, smart prosthetics still serve to aid people with disabilities, but in the future, artificial body parts could be better than their biological originals. Humans will be able to upgrade themselves. Why this will happen and what it will do to us and to society is the topic of discussion between futurologist Georges T. Roos and psychologist Bertolt Meyer, who is to a certain extent already a cyborg today.
Keywords: cyborg, competence/incompetence, artificial intelligence, neuro-enhancement, norms, prostheses
Page: 7

Katharina Tietze
«I REALLY LIKE APPLAUSE» – CREATIVE EDUCATION AND PEOPLE WITH DOWN SYNDROME
Down Syndrome, also known as trisomy 21, is associated with physical and mental impairment, which can manifest itself with varying severity. However, in daily life those who are affected by this handicap are in part still as far as ever from the equality guaranteed by the UN Convention on Human Rights ratified in 2006 – as a glance at its implementation in various countries shows. Still, there have also been encouraging approaches that further promote inclusion.
Keywords: Down Syndrome, identity, inclusion, Trisomy 21, equality, participation
Page: 12

Daniel Stanislaus Martel
SUPPORT FOR MANY OR LUXURY FOR THE FEW?
Despite the availability of increasingly more sophisticated aids, we hope for even better artificial limbs and curative treatments for people with disabilities. In the First World, these have developed from simple supports to high-tech products. However, rising costs have triggered a discussion about financing. In areas stricken by poverty and crisis, such devices are often rudimentary to this day. What happens if our world breaks down or exhausts itself, if raw materials become scarce? Will such complex apparatuses still be possible then? Conversely, couldn’t disabled people in the Global South also hope for better equipment thanks to new materials and electronics, or are financial considerations standing in the way?
Keywords: artificial limbs, prosthetic legs, resource scarcity, medical technology, neurocontrol
Page: 16

Mareike Teigeler
ON THE (IN)VISIBILITY OF DOWN SYNDROME
The author critically questions the social power relations that are emblematically reflected in dealings with people who have Down syndrome. The openness to which a liberal, post-dogmatic society aspires is undermined because people with this disability are not actively engaged in social negotiations and are hardly involved in the process of their own visibility.
Keywords: Down Syndrome, normalism, inclusion, capitalism, exclusion
Page: 19

Jakub Samochowiec
ON THE ROAD TO INCLUSION – HOW NEW TECHNOLOGIES CAN HELP
New technologies open up new potential for inclusion and participation. Especially for people with disabilities, technological developments such as the smartphone, GPS or high-tech prostheses can enable greater participation in social life. But the road to inclusion is sometimes blocked by (unnecessary) hurdles, which the author examines more closely.
Keywords: high-tech prostheses, smartphones, disability insurance, financing, inclusion, prostheses, connectivity, new technologies
Page: 22

Lukas Drosten
A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO SELF-DETERMINED MOBILITY
In Kenya and Uganda, people with disabilities continue to be discriminated against and stigmatized. Project Circleg, a social enterprise based in Zurich, is developing cost-effective and functional leg prostheses to enable people with walking disabilities to move independently. By incorporating user-centered design and storytelling, they want to make a long-term contribution to breaking through social stigma.
Keywords: Project Circleg, prosthetic legs, user-centered design, Uganda, Kenya
Page: 26

Anni Kern
CYBATHLON – MOVING PEOPLE AND TECHNOLOGY
Easier access to and more intensive development of user-oriented assistance sys- tems for people with disabilities leads to more comprehensive social and political participation and reduces the socio-economic burden. The CYBATHLON is a new platform created at ETH Zurich around an international competition for people with disabilities with the aim of advancing the development of assistance systems, such as robotic exoskeletons, mind control, or intelligent prosthetics, and with them inclusion worldwide.
Keywords: disability, inclusion, participation, robotics, technology, competition
Page: 30

Delphine Magara
DEMOCRACY FOR ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
How can artificial intelligence be reconciled with ethics? How can it be used for the benefit of mankind? What measures must be taken to involve as large a portion of the (global) population as possible in decision-making? The think tank foraus – in cooperation with swissnex and AI Commons – has been working on answers to these and other questions.
Keywords: artificial intelligence (AI), inclusion, global governance, education, digitalization
Page: 37

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